Curing Brown Spots in Lawns Caused by Dogs

 

 

Dog urine and feces can often be a frustrating problem in relation to lawn care. Small amounts may produce a green-up or fertilizer-effect while larger amounts often result in lawn burn or dead patches.

 

The basic problem with dog urine or feces on lawns is related to the nitrogen content and concentration of these waste products. Urine, when produced as a waste product by dogs is primarily excess nitrogen being removed from the body via the kidneys.

 

On dry or dormant grass the problem is intensified by the ‘scalding effect’ of the warm liquid.

 

Female dogs, being less likely to urine mark and more likely to squat, are the primary culprits of lawn damage since they will urinate anywhere on a lawn and usually all at once. These results in a single nitrogen dump confined to a small patch of grass. The brown spot that results will often have a green ring around the outside. The nitrogen overload at the center causes the burn, but as the urine is diluted toward the periphery and has a fertilizer effect. This characteristic brown spot, green ring pattern has been called "female dog spot disease" by some horticulturists. As might be expected, lawns are most susceptible to nitrogen burns when standard fertilizers are maximized in the lawn.

 

Once male dogs begin urine marking they utilize many and numerous scent posts resulting in numerous, small volume urinations rather than large volume puddles. Grass can handle small volume nitrogen bursts easier than fertilizer overload. Unfortunately, a young bush, shrub, vine or tree sprout that becomes a marking post may receive nitrogen overload with repeated marking and may die if continually "marked.” The same treatments as above for brown spots work controlling this problem as well.

 

Some people add ingredients, such as tomato juice or baking soda, to their dog's food to change the pH balance of its urine. The alkalinity or acidity of urine has little, if anything, to do with brown spots. It doesn't work, and vets say it could be detrimental to the dog’s health. A veterinarian should always be consulted prior to making any dietary modifications. One thing that does help is to make sure your dogs get plenty of water. The more water they drink the more diluted the urine is.

 

You can bring these ‘Brown Spots’ to minimum in several ways that are environmentally safe and will not harm you or your pets:

 

One - Water down these spots as soon as they happen with fresh water. This will dilute the nitrogen before it has a chance to burn the grass and controls scalding. The problem with this method is that you are not always able to catch the problem when it happens. You are also washing the nitrogen through the plant root zone and into the ground water system adding to environmental problems.

 

Two - is using a liquid Humate with live beneficial soil biology. A Humate is organic material that has been broken down as far as nature allows. Humates will combine with the nitrogen and store it in a way that it is slowly released. This combined with the beneficial soil biology that works with plant roots to make the nitrogen available to the grass/plant for growth.

 

Three - is similar to the second one, is the use of ‘Compost Tea’. These products do not hold up well in storage so if you decide to use one of them, buy in small quantities so it remains effective. If you brew your own tea, be sure you use a good starter to quickly start all of the biology needed. Worm tea will also work.

 

Four - There are a number of products on the market with grass seed in them that if properly applied will green up the area. This does not work well in many areas in the south where Saint Augustine grass is used. There are other products that have green dye to artificially cover the damage.

 

Remember that using a fully organic program on your yard will help protect the environment, pets, wildlife and children – Go Green – Go Organic.

 

Once male dogs begin urine marking they utilize many and numerous scent posts resulting in numerous, small volume urinations rather than large volume puddles. Grass can handle small volume nitrogen bursts easier than fertilizer overload. Unfortunately, a young bush, shrub, vine or tree sprout that becomes a marking post may receive nitrogen overload with repeated marking and may die if continually "marked.” The same treatments as above for brown spots work controlling this problem as well.

 

. Dog feces can be a disease-bearing, toxic pollutant associated with coliform bacteria, salmonella, giardia, and E. coli. Pick it up where possible and dispose of in a safe manner. Do not put dog feces in compost piles that will be used in areas that are used to produce food.

 

Recommendations:

 

For the normal dog owner:

To get complete, safe relief the Natural Humate approach does an excellent job of curing problem areas. A “Complete Natural Ancient Humus” with natural live biology such as Turf & Garden Pro by TurfPro USA  does the job.

It is 100% organic and totally safe around pets and children.

 

 

For larger problem areas:

For owners of a large number of dogs, kennels, dog parks, outside training areas and other gathering areas for dogs Ark Pro 1 by TurfPro USA does the job of protecting the grass form hot spots and eliminates odor caused by urine buildup. It was specially developed to heavy concentrations of animal waste. Special biology was added to the product that can lock up and break down ammonia caused by high levels of urine. It also has other added biology to break down solid wastes where all feces cannot be picked up.

 

Protecting our families, pets and the environment should be a major concern for all of us.

 

If you have any questions please contact jloepp@turfprousa.com  or call (407)340-7639

On-line sales contact www.ecofriendlyonline.com or call (407) 963-6001

                   

Intellectual property of J.R. Loepp - All rights Reserved   3002A 9-20-10

Copyright ® 2010 Organic Products Company  All rights reserved.

TEST